School’s (almost) out for summer.

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At the end of last semester I moved one step closer to finishing up my graduate studies — huzzah! — by completing all the coursework requirements. The two courses that I took were exceedingly different from each other but, for me, also showed off the value of such a multidisciplinary program.

I took a second Schulich MBA course, Communications Policy taught by Peter Grant of McCarthy Tétrault. Much like my previous MBA course, I was able to contribute a lot of technical understanding about communications systems. I was also pleasantly surprised just how much of the various media industries I already had a strong knowledge about — some days it felt like the class was my RSS feed come to life. It was a great opportunity to debate various issues on a regular basis with others interested in the topics.

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Academic goal achieved, I’m a “published’ author!

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Although my current research focuses on telecoms and spectrum policy, my interests in ICT are fairly broad. In part, this comes from my political science background and the emergence of Web2.0 services during the latter part of my undergraduate studies. And, of course, my Honours Thesis explored ICT’s impact on democratic processes. During my time at Ryerson, I’ve been able to contribute to three distinct research projects. There’s the current (and longest/best fit) CSPR project, a short stint with the Infoscape Lab, where I supported some quantitative analysis for a book, and a couple of projects with the Privacy and Cyber Crime Institute.

The primary project involved working with Dr. Avner Levin on a report for Public Safety Canada, helping to inform Canada’s developing cybercrime strategy. Along with another graduate student, we conducted a comparative review of strategies of a number of countries, including those in the Anglosphere, Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States, Baltic Region, and China. Our findings argue that states’ strategies can largely be summed up as either a Budapest-approach (named for the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime) that emphasize law enforcement acting across state lines or a UN-informational security approach, which emphasizes state sovereignty.

A copy of our report can be found online — Levin, A. Research Assistance provided by Goodrick, P., and Ilkina, D. “Securing Cyberspace: A Comparative Review of Strategies Worldwide” Final Report, July 2012.

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Post-CTS12

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Just wrapped up the 2012 Canadian Telecom Summit, really glad I was able to go. Being able to access the student pricing was great, so getting one of the Orion Network-sponsored scholarships from Mark Goldberg was much appreciated!

OpenText’s Tom Jenkins reminded me of Cornelia Woll’s book, when he made the argument that industry needed to work with government but to also to lead them in policy formation. So like Woll, but opposite. The other big picture presentation that was quite engaging, delivered by Malcolm Frank of Cognizant, discussed implications of the Future of Work. Of course, the Regulatory Blockbuster panel lived up to its reputation and while the Wireless Spectrum: Paying for Air panel wasn’t as strong, I found some of the comments by Dean Brenner, VP Government Affairs for Qualcomm, to be illuminating regarding some technical issues.

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Harold Innis and Canadian Telecom Policy

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The last semester my focus had been a bit split.

I came into the year working on a report for Public Safety Canada through Ryerson’s Privacy & Cybercrime Institute. We were tasked with putting together a comparative analysis of strategies and policies states were undertaking involving both pulic and private sectors. It was quite interesting and while not directly focused on my core research, it was definitely related to Canada’s digital policy and was a great opportunity to help contribute to the policy formation process.

More directly, I have had the opportunity to work on a research project around the 700 MHz spectrum auction. Up until now it had been rather short term but with the research leads SSHRC-funding being approved, the team is looking to formulate a longer term project around the auction process. My role is still to be determined, as my part-time graduate student status may have an impact on hours I can be offered. That said, I’m currently working with the post-doc to put together a paper for submission to an academic journal by the end of the summer.

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Email amongst Friends leads to Musings about Telecoms

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A graphic designer/illustrator friend of mine emailed to ask of my thoughts were regarding the new branding for Sportsnet due to my interest in the Canadian telecom sector. Thought I’d make some additions and edits, and turn my reply into a post.

James brought up it’s positioning vis-à-vis TSN, Canada’s leader in sports broadcasting, and some potential latent Americanization with the red, white[-ish] and blue colour scheme. I wasn’t actually aware of the re-brand being busy with school and not having TV. And as I primarily play attention to the distribution side of things instead of content, my regular news feeds didn’t have anything on it. Googling brought up a Globe & Mail article that stated it was a Hollywood firm that did the new logo but they also did SportsCentre on TSN.

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Fragmented markets, higher costs

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You would be hard pressed to find anyone unwilling to acknowledge telecoms importance in supporting economic, political and social development in both advanced and emerging countries. Shifts to knowledge-based economies and greater global integration of newly industrialized states — even agricultural economies — all benefit from increased broadband (both wired and wireless) penetration and available bandwidth, even if that benefit is currently uneven. The impacts of globalization allows for immense economies of scale that can help drive down infrastructure costs.

With LTE’s emergence as the de facto 4G infrastructure of choice over WiMax, benefits should be able to pass along to consumers but one of the remaining challenges for international travellers will be the variation of frequencies for technologies. Another, related, will be the amount of networks phones will need to support over the next little while. 2G, various 3G technologies and the new LTE-Lite (and eventually LTE-Advanced).

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One way to speed up advanced network deployments

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While I haven’t had much chance to start on another book, I’ve been increasing the amount of telecommunications feeds to my information stream. It’s stimulating questions and areas of inquiry for me to be thinking about as I look to start classes in the fall. I’ve requested CC8940 – The Political Economy of Communication and Culture and should be joined by at least one friendly face.

While reading, I came across this story from Engadget, noting Ericsson is testing an LTE-Advanced network achieving mobile 1Gbps downloads in trials.

Not only is Ericsson cranking up the speed, it’s also endeavoring to make the new network more efficient by offering 8×8 MIMO (Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output) functionality, which enables data to be retrieved and sent faster regardless of network congestion.

Of course, these test results are taking advantage of 60MHz available bandwidth, as opposed to the global max of 20MHz and the US standard of 10.

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Evolution of my “Considerations”

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So, it looks like I may have been a little unfair to Gruber in my last post. Or, at the least, a bit premature. I took advantage of the sun’s emergence this afternoon to sit outside and finish reading the final chapter in The Economics of Mobile Telecommunications. Though I had assumed that a final chapter before the Appendix would offer a conclusion and not a lot of further analysis, I found some very interesting observations and Gruber addressed many of the concerns I raised at the end of my last post.

The final chapter, ‘The evolution of market structure in mobile telecommunication markets’, also reinforced my acknowledgment that I’m not a natural economist. It took me about half an hour to really wrap my head around about 3 pages of material. To be fair to me, some of that was while in transit, which is not the easiest way to think about the implications of formulas like Π(n*, s, F) > 0 > Π(n* + 1, s, F) — the zero entry condition used to help determine the Cournot equilibrium number of firms in a homogeneous goods industry. [Note to self: need to read up more on industrial organization and oligopoly theory.]

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Economic Considerations of Mobile Telecom Markets

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Part of my self-directed efforts to get ready for ComCult this fall includes trying to increase my foundational knowledge of telecoms policy. One thing that’s become apparent is although I still consume a lot of information through various feeds (and share some of the telecom relevant stuff on one of my Twitter accounts), it’s been a while since I’ve done a lot of dense, academic reading. As such — and along with my other commitments — it’s taken longer than I expected to get through The Economics of Mobile Telecommunications by Harald Gruber.

One of the things I enjoyed was gaining some sense of the development of mobile telecommunication networks from a policy viewpoint. As my undergrad focused on political science, Gruber’s economic handling of the material also added to some of my struggles. I only took a couple macro economics courses at post-secondary and a political science stats class. When discussing strengths and weaknesses of policy choices by various states, I could follow along fairly well. When he started getting into formulas in the chapters on ‘Determinants of diffusion of services’ and ‘Market conduct and pricing issues’, not quite so smoothly.

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Spectrum Wirless Crunch

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FCC commissioner Julius Genachowski’s comments on the spectrum wireless crunch were interesting to me, if in part because Canada seems to be about 5 years behind the US in recent spectrum auctions. While we in Canada are currently preparing for a likely 2012 auction in the 700 MHz band, the US is starting to increase discussions of even more allotment as part of their National Broadband Plan, identifying 500 MHz by 2020 as necessary to meet connectivity demand.

It’ll be interesting to see how Industry Canada determines to set up our next auction rules and whether they plan to hold any aside for new market entrants, current small market share providers or retain any portion as unlicensed for innovation generation.