Paul Goodrick

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by Paul Goodrick

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by Paul Goodrick

 

Winner’s Curse: If you buy it, they still may not support it.

[Update: The Nexus 6, which supports Band 12, was launched in Canada November 26th. Rogers did not secure spectrum in the AWS-3 Auction in early 2015.] Winner’s Curse: A phenomenon that may occur in common value auctions, where the winner will tend to overpay due to incomplete information. I was planning on writing a short blurb about Rogers and winner’s
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School’s (almost) out for summer.

At the end of last semester I moved one step closer to finishing up my graduate studies — huzzah! — by completing all the coursework requirements. The two courses that I took were exceedingly different from each other but, for me, also showed off the value of such a multidisciplinary program. I took a second Schulich MBA course, Communications Policy
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Still unclear on 700MHz outcomes.

I’m currently in the process of finalizing my Major Research Project proposal, so I kinda wish that the 700MHz spectrum auction had finished sometime next week (or the week after!). I’d much rather be analyzing the results and reading others analysis of outcomes than finding some additional sources to support my methodological approach — though I’ll be
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A simple experiment highlighting why I’m more of an applied than theoretical researcher.

Due to scheduling challenges and lack of telecom-specific electives in my program (note to all prospective graduate students: if you’re interested in specific courses within a program, check to see they are actually offered), I ended up taking two research methods courses for my program. I’d originally taken Applied Research Methods: Policy & Regulatory Studies
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Academic goal achieved, I’m a “published’ author!

Although my current research focuses on telecoms and spectrum policy, my interests in ICT are fairly broad. In part, this comes from my political science background and the emergence of Web2.0 services during the latter part of my undergraduate studies. And, of course, my Honours Thesis explored ICT’s impact on democratic processes. During my time
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CSPR & the pending 700MHz auction

One of the big challenges in updating this site is being so busy between classwork, my ‘day job’, and the work I’m doing with the Canadian Spectrum Policy Research group at Ryerson University. I end up doing a lot of research duties for the principal investigator while also writing for the website. Not that I’m
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Vertically Integrated Studies

In Fall 2012, I took CC 8844: Intro to Broadcast Management (Managing In The New Broadcast World) with Doug Barrett. While not an out-of-program course, its home is the Schulich School of Business’ MBA program — so not the standard ComCult course. My aim was two-fold, add a course with a strong, practical component to my
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Summer 2012 Reading

I’ve often been known to say I know more about cellphones then 95% of people, but compared to that 5%, I don’t know much. So one of my primary goals this past summer was to improve my technical knowledge of mobile communication network architectures and technologies. I really enjoy reading Martin Sauter’s blog WirelessMoves — even when
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Still pondering capacity…

I’ve been busy working on a specific work project — writing copy for a spectrum/telecom primer website — so haven’t gotten as far along with my own capacity project as I’d like. Though this probably speaks to one of the best benefits that professors have mentioned about grad school, the space and time to just
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Post-CTS12

Just wrapped up the 2012 Canadian Telecom Summit, really glad I was able to go. Being able to access the student pricing was great, so getting one of the Orion Network-sponsored scholarships from Mark Goldberg was much appreciated! OpenText’s Tom Jenkins reminded me of Cornelia Woll’s book, when he made the argument that industry needed
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Harold Innis and Canadian Telecom Policy

The last semester my focus had been a bit split. I came into the year working on a report for Public Safety Canada through Ryerson’s Privacy & Cybercrime Institute. We were tasked with putting together a comparative analysis of strategies and policies states were undertaking involving both pulic and private sectors. It was quite interesting
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Business Lobbying and Canadian Telecom Governance

Another recently completed selection of my winter reading was Cornelia Woll’s Firm Interests: How Governments Shape Business Lobbying on Global Trade. Woll explored the relationship between government economic policy and business lobbying interests, suggesting in complex and transitional periods where business may not have clearly articulated — or even internally known — positions, government can
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Email amongst Friends leads to Musings about Telecoms

A graphic designer/illustrator friend of mine emailed to ask of my thoughts were regarding the new branding for Sportsnet due to my interest in the Canadian telecom sector. Thought I’d make some additions and edits, and turn my reply into a post. James brought up it’s positioning vis-à-vis TSN, Canada’s leader in sports broadcasting, and
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Fragmented markets, higher costs

You would be hard pressed to find anyone unwilling to acknowledge telecoms importance in supporting economic, political and social development in both advanced and emerging countries. Shifts to knowledge-based economies and greater global integration of newly industrialized states — even agricultural economies — all benefit from increased broadband (both wired and wireless) penetration and available bandwidth, even
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Spectrum, how ‘scarce’ is it?

With the ongoing AT&T-T-Mobile proposed merger continuing to attract a lot of attention, I’m using it as a good comparative analysis case study for spectrum politics in Canada. Especially when seen as a proxy for the assumed spectrum crunch coming due to an explosion in the usage of wireless broadband for smartphones and other devices. The problem
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Reflections on ‘Navigating Convergence II’

Going through my feed reader, Mark Goldberg had pointed out that the CRTC has released a 2011 edition of the ‘Charting Canadian Communications Change and Regulatory Implications: Navigating Convergence II’ [PDF / HTML]. I’m making my way through the document and thought I’d note a couple quick observations. According to Media Technology Monitor (MTM), 27
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One way to speed up advanced network deployments

While I haven’t had much chance to start on another book, I’ve been increasing the amount of telecommunications feeds to my information stream. It’s stimulating questions and areas of inquiry for me to be thinking about as I look to start classes in the fall. I’ve requested CC8940 – The Political Economy of Communication and
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Evolution of my “Considerations”

So, it looks like I may have been a little unfair to Gruber in my last post. Or, at the least, a bit premature. I took advantage of the sun’s emergence this afternoon to sit outside and finish reading the final chapter in The Economics of Mobile Telecommunications. Though I had assumed that a final
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Economic Considerations of Mobile Telecom Markets

Part of my self-directed efforts to get ready for ComCult this fall includes trying to increase my foundational knowledge of telecoms policy. One thing that’s become apparent is although I still consume a lot of information through various feeds (and share some of the telecom relevant stuff on one of my Twitter accounts), it’s been
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Spectrum Wirless Crunch

FCC commissioner Julius Genachowski’s comments on the spectrum wireless crunch were interesting to me, if in part because Canada seems to be about 5 years behind the US in recent spectrum auctions. While we in Canada are currently preparing for a likely 2012 auction in the 700 MHz band, the US is starting to increase
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ComCult – Statement of Interest

I thought it might be interesting to post my Statement of Interest for the Ryerson-York ComCult program, as it allows me to make the document more interactive then a hardcopy submission permitted.
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Application sent, fingers crossed

Last week, I sent off my application to the Communication and Culture Program, offered jointly through Ryerson and York Universities. If accepted, I’m looking to start part time studies in September for an MA. The opportunity to study with a lot of smart and interesting researchers would be really exciting and I hope to be
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Self-testing mobile data speeds

As a result of thinking about how Internet (fixed line and mobile) usage is impacting Canadian and global society, I’ve been starting to look a lot closer at the services I’ve personally been using and how they rank against international standards. With the whole 3G/”4G” network question around mobile data speeds, I wondered how my
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WiFi and community development

Just finished reading ‘Building WiFi Networks for Communities’, [PDF] an article by Catherine Middleton and Barbara Crow. It was useful in looking at alternative models for offering mobile Internet connectivity for local communities, especially for reviewing efforts this past summer by my own municipality of New Westminster to provide WiFi hotspots. The Fredericton eZone model
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When a standard isn’t a standard

When I first came across this article about the roast of AT&T in a commercial for T-Mobile’s launch of the an HSPA+ “4G” network, it made me consider differences between the American and Canadian telecom industries. The Wall Street Journal says that T-Mobile and Sprint are creating confusion with the use of 4G as a
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Questions about spectrum governance

With the upcoming 700MHz spectrum auction, I’m looking to start doing more of a critical reading on governance issues and how that impacts policy. I picked up Toward an Evolutionary Regime for Spectrum Governance – Licensing or Unrestricted Entry? [PDF] from the library. The work is put out by American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy
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Not so shocking – states and companies cripple mobile devices for their own interests

ReadWriteWeb steered me towards this article on Ogle Earth, “Beware: Chinese iPhone 4 comes with a crippled Maps app”. Apparently Apple’s latest version of the iPhone uses China’s censored dataset for location information. Problems arise in two areas, political and practical. In the political realm, disputed borders are shown to confirm to official Chinese claims.
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The VHS-Beta debate of 4G infrastructure

I’ve had this article by Michelle Sklar sitting in a tab for a couple weeks trying to think of some commentary. Mostly because of an article I tweeted regarding Intel closing down its WiMax office. To be fair to Sklar, she wrote about the two standards two weeks before the Intel announcement, although I read
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Security concerns with Chinese telecom companies

This post by Andy Greenberg over at Forbes got me thinking about the intersection of legitimate security concerns and trade protectionism in the globalized nature of ICT equipment and networks. Greenberg is commenting on a Washington Post story of US Senator’s investigating a proposed sale of telecommunications networking gear sale by Shenzhen, China-based Huawei to
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Different Asian market, different focus

While I mostly look to China in trying to create a comparative analysis framework for the Canadian ICT industry, it’s hard to completely omit Japan due to their mobile sector. I’ve tended to think of Japan in terms of handsets and end-user technologies, not necessarily in terms of infrastructure or policy. So coming across this
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QNet – Coquitlam’s municipal network infrastructure

As I noted earlier, my hometown of Coquitlam is looking to improve telecommunications infrastructure through the recently launched community-based QNet, an initiative to deploy dark fibre throughout the city. I read through the 2008 Annual Report [pdf] to get some more information and it had some interesting tidbits.
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Cyber Security and Protectionism

I was catching up on a bunch of article’s at the end of last week and I noticed a trend coming through on the Infowar Monitor feed. From links about Chinese-based attacks on India’s Russian embassy website to articles discussing the impact of hacking on Australian businesses, these stories illustrate the growing cyber-antagonism coming from
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Progressive Canadian Telecom Policy Views

Finally finished reading ‘For Sale to the Highest Bidder: Telecom Policy in Canada’, put out by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. I had come across it last fall while starting to do some investigation into spectrum issues in Canada. My main interest was the chapter ‘Spectrum Matters: Clearing and Reclaiming the Spectrum Commons’ by
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Telecom Research Areas for 2010

Looking at the year ahead, I’m hoping to focus my research areas for telecoms around 3 broad topics: Comparative Analysis; Spectrum Issues; Canadian Telecom Policy.
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Comparative analysis can provide interesting insights of relationships between governments, regulators, consumers and industry.

Wired.com’s article on the punk rock scene developing in China has me thinking of Irene Wu’s book, ‘From Iron Fist to Invisible Hand: The Uneven Path of Telecommunications Reform in China‘. One of the things that really struck me during my reading was her observation of small players that launched telecommunication services illegally to meet
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Twitter Blog: Twitter Vote Report

I came across this video Twitter Vote Report on the Twitter Blog. It’s interesting to see this behaviour in America, similar in action to young activists in Iran during elections. Text messaging also played a critical role in the Orange Revolution in 2004-2005 and the Philippines People Power II in 2001.
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