Academic goal achieved, I’m a “published’ author!

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Although my current research focuses on telecoms and spectrum policy, my interests in ICT are fairly broad. In part, this comes from my political science background and the emergence of Web2.0 services during the latter part of my undergraduate studies. And, of course, my Honours Thesis explored ICT’s impact on democratic processes. During my time at Ryerson, I’ve been able to contribute to three distinct research projects. There’s the current (and longest/best fit) CSPR project, a short stint with the Infoscape Lab, where I supported some quantitative analysis for a book, and a couple of projects with the Privacy and Cyber Crime Institute.

The primary project involved working with Dr. Avner Levin on a report for Public Safety Canada, helping to inform Canada’s developing cybercrime strategy. Along with another graduate student, we conducted a comparative review of strategies of a number of countries, including those in the Anglosphere, Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States, Baltic Region, and China. Our findings argue that states’ strategies can largely be summed up as either a Budapest-approach (named for the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cybercrime) that emphasize law enforcement acting across state lines or a UN-informational security approach, which emphasizes state sovereignty.

A copy of our report can be found online — Levin, A. Research Assistance provided by Goodrick, P., and Ilkina, D. “Securing Cyberspace: A Comparative Review of Strategies Worldwide” Final Report, July 2012.

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