Fragmented markets, higher costs

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You would be hard pressed to find anyone unwilling to acknowledge telecoms importance in supporting economic, political and social development in both advanced and emerging countries. Shifts to knowledge-based economies and greater global integration of newly industrialized states — even agricultural economies — all benefit from increased broadband (both wired and wireless) penetration and available bandwidth, even if that benefit is currently uneven. The impacts of globalization allows for immense economies of scale that can help drive down infrastructure costs.

With LTE’s emergence as the de facto 4G infrastructure of choice over WiMax, benefits should be able to pass along to consumers but one of the remaining challenges for international travellers will be the variation of frequencies for technologies. Another, related, will be the amount of networks phones will need to support over the next little while. 2G, various 3G technologies and the new LTE-Lite (and eventually LTE-Advanced).

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Spectrum, how ‘scarce’ is it?

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With the ongoing AT&T-T-Mobile proposed merger continuing to attract a lot of attention, I’m using it as a good comparative analysis case study for spectrum politics in Canada. Especially when seen as a proxy for the assumed spectrum crunch coming due to an explosion in the usage of wireless broadband for smartphones and other devices.

The problem is, of course, while there’s definitely evidence of increased data consumption, the spectrum crunch is less clear and straightforward.

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